Down’s Syndrome – To Abort or Not?


richard-dawkinsAnother Twitter controversy erupted last night, and is being reported today in the Guardian newspaper; when the scientist Richard Dawkins said, in a Tweet it was immoral not to abort a baby with Down’s Syndrome.

Apparently the argument stemmed because Richard Dawkins, posted a tweet about a foreign women in Ireland who was force-fed, forced to carry her baby until it was deemed fit that a caesarean would be safe, all because she wanted an abortion.

Richard Dawkins tweeted:

To which came the reply

Richard Dawkins then replied

Then a new person enters the conversation, highlighting that they wouldn’t know what to do if they were ever faced with the decision about whether or not to terminate a pregnancy if the unborn foetus was diagnosed as having Down’s Syndrome.

Richard Dawkins then replied

Of course the comments of Richard Dawkins caused a public outcry on Twitter and he tweeted this

So is it immoral to bring a baby into this world with Down’s Syndrome?  I don’t know.  But the biggest question should be if a woman is forced to make this decision and decides to take the road of abortion, should she feel guilty, ashamed and be forced to hide her decision from others,  for fear of what others might think or say? Should she and her partner (if joint decision) not be able to talk about their decision and why they choose it, for fear of retribution?

I don’t think any one is asking for a law to be brought in that stipulates that all unborn foetuses that are diagnosed should be aborted.  But there is a stigma attached to a woman who decides that she couldn’t cope with having a Down’s Syndrome child.  There are people who do think it is immoral to bring a child, that could need care all its life into this world.

A person faced with such a dilemma will probably have the fear of what will happen to this child, should they die?  Will they be able to cope?  How will it affect the other children they have? By keeping this baby will it mean that they will have less time, due to the amount of care needed to a Down’s Syndrome child, with their other children?

There are a lot of things for a family to think about when making the decision, and those who take the route of abortion must feel guilty that they couldn’t cope and this is the decision they made; should we as compassionate and empathetic people make their decision even harder for them to bear?  No we shouldn’t.

Like if a woman is rape she has the choice of whether or not to abort this foetus; so should a family be allowed to decide upon whether or not to abort a child with Down’s or with any other serious  medical condition, without the added guilt and shame from those who don’t agree with their decision, being thrust upon them?

Some people just couldn’t cope and they know it and they decide the best option for them is to abort… there is no shame in that.  And there is no right or wrong decision when it comes to the reasons why people choose  to abort a baby.

For all those who want to stop abortions and make abortion illegal, all I will say is this. If abortion is made illegal, we can say ‘welcome back’ to the back-street abortionists.  Abortions will still continue, but there will be greater risks to the mother, because they are being carried out in dark seedy places, with no medical back-up on hand. Women could bleed to death or face the prospect of never having children again.  Children could be left motherless, because of back street abortionists.

Do we really want to turn back to the dark ages?

Advertisements

Published by

Bren

Bren Ryan is a female amateaur photographer who along with her husband, Ashley, have created a photography blog called RyanPhotography showcasing the places they visited places on their Photography journey. Bren and Ashley primarily concentrate their photographic skills to landscape, architecture and floral subjects. Based in the South East of England they hope to give their readers an insight to the wonderful landscapes, buildings and places to visit in the South of England and beyond.

Please feel free to comment on this post...

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s